About

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James is our most mundane villain. His victim is Bruce, our typical Aussie, who bleeds from the hip pocket because of James’ actions. Game of Mates tells a tale of economic theft across major sectors of Australia’s economy, showing how James and his group of well-connected Mates siphon off billions from the economy to line their own pockets. In property, mining, transport, banking, superannuation, and many more sectors, James and his Mates cooperate to steal huge chunks of the economic pie for themselves.

If you want to know how much this costs the nation, how it is done, and what we can do about, Game of Mates is the book for you. You will find no-nonsense analysis informed by the best political and economic research. Those in the Game are named. The costs of hundreds of billions of dollars a year are laid out. Real solutions are proposed and fake solutions are called out as such.

The Authors

Dr Cameron K. Murray

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Cameron is an economist and consultant who specialises in property markets, environmental economics, and corruption. He teaches at the University of Queensland, blogs at fresheconomicthinking.com and tweets as DrCameronMurray.

Professor Paul Frijters

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Paul is a prominent research economist and has published over 70 papers in fields including unemployment policy, discrimination and economic development. He regularly commentates on economic issues in newspapers and on television, including articles in the New York Times and on the BBC. He specialises in applied micro-econometrics, including labour , happiness, and health economics, though he has also worked on pure theoretical topics in macro and micro fields. Currently, Paul is a Project Director and Professorial Research Fellow in the Centre for Economic Performance Wellbeing Programme at the London School of Economics.